Child Vaccination, Well check up, Fun and education, medical home, community outreach, kids learning
  Child Vaccination
   
     
  2013 Recommended Immunizations (for Parents)  
  Children from Birth Through 6 Years Old (CDC); Spnish Version
Children from 7 Through 18 Years Old (CDC); Spanish Version
Recommended Immunizations for Adults (CDC);
 
  2013 Recommended Immunizations at the United States  
 

Children Aged 0-18years Immunization Schedule (CDC)
Children/Teens Immunization Catch-Up Schedule(CDC)
Adult Immunization Schedule (CDC); 6x4 Pocket-Size ;
Important Vaccinations for 11-19 Years Olds
(IAC: Immunization Action Coalition)
Children & Adolescent Immunization Summary (IAC) 
Adult Immunization Summary (IAC)  

 
 
More Vaccine Information    
CDC: Vaccines and Immunizations
  AAP: Vaccine and Diseases
CDC Vaccine Information Statement CDC link; IAC Link
Diphtheria, Tetanus & Pertussid (DTaP)
Hepatitis A Hepatitis B
Haemophilus InfluenzaeType b (Hib)
H1N1Influenza, Live Nasal Spray
H1N1Influenza, Inactivated
Influenza, Inactivated ; Live, Intranasal
 Measles, Mumps & Rubella (MMR)
Pneumococcal Conjugate (PCV13)
Pneumococcal Conjugare (PCV7)
Pneumococcal Polysaccharide (PPV23)
Polio ; Rotavirus
Chickenpox Veccine (Varicella)
 
  Other CDC Vaccine Information Statement link immunize.org  
  Anthrax ; Japanese Encephalitis (JE-VAX)-ixiaro; Lyme Disease ; Rabies ;
Shingles - Herpes Zoster
; Smallpox ; Typhoid ; Yellow Fever
 
     
  Why Needs Vaccines?  
  Vaccine Prevent Diseases- photo AAP  
  Diseases & Vaccines Photo IAC  
  Vaccine Preventable Diseases State.il.us  
  If we stop vaccinating...; Basics CDC  
  Immune System NIAID  
  More Information for Vaccines NLM  
 
  Teen Immunization link  
  HPV- Gardasil  
  HPV- Cervarix  
  Meningococcal (MCV)  
  Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Tdap)  
     
   
     
  Vaccine Safety  
  AAP: Vaccine Safety 
  CDC: Vaccine Safety  
  CDC Addressing Common Concerns  
  CDC: Possible Side-Effects  
  CDC: Who should not get vaccinated?  
  VAERS Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting  
 
  Autism and Vaccines  
  Addressing Concerns about Autism CDC
MMR Vaccine Safety CDC
Vaccine Safety AAP
 
     
     
     
     
  After Shot Care  
  How to Sooth After Shots  
  After Shots (IAC) Spanish  
     
     
 
  Travel and Vaccines  
  Travel and Vaccinations CDC  
  With Infants and Young Children CDC  
  University Chicago Travel Clinic  
     
 
News & Information

2013-2014 Flu and Flu Vaccination

Measles cases identified in Chincago (Chicago Department of Public Health, July, 2013). Measles is a highly contagious viral illness that is characterized by fever, rash, running nose, pink eyes, and white spots inside the mouth (Koplik's spots).
To report a suspected measles case, Chicago providers should contact CDPH at 312-746-5911 (weekdays 8:30AM-4:30PM) or the CDPH communicable disease on-call physician at 311 (afterhours, on weekends and holidays). 

CDC: Baby’s First Vaccines
www.immunize.org: Toll-Free Hotlines
immunize.org: Clear Answers & Smart Advice About Your Baby's Shots
 
Vaccine Clinics & Outreach
Comer_Family_Vaccine_Clinic 2012-2013: will come in September, 2012
Comer_Family_Vaccine_Clinic_2012-2013
UC Children Travel Clinic
UC Infection Prevention Outreach
School-Based Vaccination Program
 
Benefits of Vaccines

From the research over the last decades, vaccines are highly beneficial to children to prevent infectious diseases. Vaccines, like medicines, are possible causes of medical problems. Most are mild and last for few days. Getting vaccine-preventable diseases is much riskier than getting the vaccines.

Please read professional information for immunizations.
Please immunize your child.
Outbreaks of preventable diseases such as measles have occured recently in the United States and England among unimmunized children.

Before the measles vaccine was available, almost all children got the disease.
I120 people died during a measles epidemic outbreak between 1989 and 1991.
There were 1.1 million deaths occurred worldwide from measles in 1995.
Grandparents may still remember a polio epidemic involvine 20,000 people in 1952, leaving many people dead or crippled for life.

Pertussis (whooping cough) can cause complications such as respiratory distress, seizures, coma, and permanent brain damage in infants. Pertussis is an endemic and has not been eradicated.

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and pneumococcal infection can cause deadly bacterial meningitis, and also pneumonia, blindness, and hearing loss. One in 200 children developed severe Hib disease by age 5 before the vaccine was available.

Hepatitis B can cause significant problems such as chronic liver disease, liver failure, and liver cancers. Hepatitis B can pass from one person to another through blood, body fluids, and breast milk.

 
 
 
 
 

 


Comer Children's Hospital 5721 S. Maryland Avenue Chicago, IL 60637
The page initiated on 04/18/2006, updated on 08/23/2013